Zagreus

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Zagreus
Zagreus.png
Info
Title Prince of the Underworld
Relations Hades (Father)

Persephone (Mother)
Nyx (Adoptive Mother)
Zeus (Uncle)
Poseidon (Uncle)
Athena (Cousin)
Artemis (Cousin)
Ares (Cousin)
Cerberus (Pet)

Affiliation House of Hades
Voice Darren Korb

Zagreus is the son of Hades and Prince of the Underworld. He is the main character and is controlled by the player.

Zagreus has always had a sense that he doesn't belong in the House of Hades; recently, he has decided, against his father's will, to escape from the Underworld no matter how many tries it might take him. He's aided and encouraged in his journey primarily by his caretaker Nyx and his mentor Achilles. Others outside the House of Hades, such as Sisyphus, Charon, and the Olympian Gods sometimes offer their aid as well.

Zagreus is met with numerous obstacles throughout the realms of Tartarus and Asphodel. He is mostly faced with various aggressive shades working for his father, but he also has run-ins with the Furies (Megaera, Tisiphone and Alecto) and with the skeletal remains of the Lernean Hydra. These battles, combined with the dangerous landscape of the Underworld, always serve to bring a painful end to Zagreus' escape attempts sooner or later.

Codex entry[edit | edit source]

Codex.png '...Take one look at him and I think any questions of his parentage are soon resolved. He never seemed to like it much, there, growing up within Lord Hades' well-appointed house. One day I took him on as a disciple, under orders from Lord Hades; the Master worried that his heir lacked any firm direction in his life. And, indeed, Zagreus took well to the martial ways, and I am proud to say now that he was my student.'


Relationships[edit | edit source]

Hades: Zagreus has a bitter relationship with his father Hades, who seems to think of him as lazy, naive, and foolish. The two frequently bicker, and Hades thwarts his escape attempts at every turn. Zagreus's memories of his father's treatment of him spurn him on at the beginning of escape attempts.

Nyx: Though Zagreus is initially shocked to learn that Nyx is not his real mother, he was understanding, and they remained on good terms. Nyx supports his decision to leave and helped him contact the Olympians.

Megaera: Zagreus and Megaera appear to have some past history, but their relationship have since ended. Megaera is aloof and hostile towards Zagreus, and thinks his escape attempts are foolish. Further strain is placed on their relationship each time they have to fight to the death.

Cerberus: Cerberus is Zagreus's beloved pet and best friend. He is affectionate towards Zagreus, and is quite mournful when he leaves. Zagreus also refuses to fight Cerberus and dislike his father using him as a way to guilt him into staying, implying both physical (implying Zagreus has to fight Cerberus) and emotional harm on the pet as a result of his son leaving.

Achilles: Achilles is Zagreus's mentor, having taught him to fight. He supports Zagreus's escape attempts and expresses pride in his progress. Upon recieving a 6th ambrosia bottle, Achilles takes Zagreus generosity for possible romantic affection and apologizes while explaining that his heart belongs to someone else. Zagreus reply implies he already 'kind of' felt or knew that was the case and whatever affection he bestows to Achilles are not for such a pursuit. Although, it could imply that Zagreus is or was at some point in love with his mentor.

Dusa: Zagreus is friendly to Dusa, and doesn't talk down to her despite their difference in status. Dusa often becomes flustered whenever he talks to her.

Olympian gods: The Olympians, most of whom are aunts, uncles, and cousins to Zagreus, seem to sympathize with him and welcome him to join them on Olympus. They contact Zagreus during escape attempts, offering a friendly chat and a Boon to aid him in his escape.

Additional notes[edit | edit source]

  • The Olympian Gods were not aware of Zagreus' existence until they were contacted by Nyx.
  • The Olympians believe Nyx is Zagreus' mother.
  • Dionysus comments that Zagreus is his favorite demigod, while Aphrodite refers to him a godling and Artemis calls him a "half-god", all implying that Zagreus is not seen by the Olympians as a true god, possibly because Nyx is not seen as a true goddess.
  • Zagreus doesn't know what birds are.
  • If Zagreus's codex entry is viewed in the game's files, there is additional text that does not appear in the game. Like the other content of the codex, it appears to be written from Achilles' point of view. More text is occasionally added along with major updates:
'Listen, Mortal. You are not supposed to be reading this. You are most bold, or most unwise, to have been digging through these arcane texts, or to have gleaned the knowledge from someone who has. Sometimes, herein, you may find traces of the weavings of the Fates. That is true. At other times, however, your attempts to glean the future shall be thwarted. Best not to spoil the surprises that the Fates may have in store for you, if you ask me. For the Fates work in mysterious ways, and defy prediction; remember that.
We all sprang from Chaos, did we not? They offer us as suitable an explanation for the sheer improbability of life and consciousness as ever I have heard. Chaos fundamentally is unexpected and inscrutable; know that it is their workings that shall forever frustrate your attempts to make predictable the ever-changing aspects of the Underworld. The days and seasons may be following a seemingly set path -- but the Underworld shall evolve as it is meant to, and by no other means.
We all are mortal and immortal, save the gods, who only are the latter. Some say that mortals flow from Dionysus from another life, for he is partly mortal from the details of his birth, and yet very much immortal in his station and his disposition. So, then, should it not be possible for other gods to be part-mortals, too? And, are we to take the stories of their ancestry at face value, unquestioningly always, even when the details of their origins are far too absurd or scandalous to be believed? Truly does the god of wine hold sway upon our minds, if such tales of their exploits are to spread unchecked, as fact.
Though I digress; let us discuss, for this one moment, Death. Death is the most expected of the gods among mortals, is he not? Entirely expected, and yet capable of striking during unexpected times, and taking unexpected forms. Yet even Death is subservient, here; Death almost never saw the light of day. Imagine, then, how empty this place would have been, how paradoxically devoid of warmth, had Death remained obscure. You are to be commended for keeping his secrets.
And when I think on Death, my mind wanders, so often as it does, to someone else, and Fear. Fear is for the weak; yet, I fear so much when it comes to him. That I may never see him again. That he shall be remembered not for all his grace and brilliance, but because he died because of me. I shall commemorate him here. He was my world. When he perished in the blasted war, because of all my stubbornness, I shortly followed him, of course. Though, somehow I knew I'd not see him again. It is not my place to say anything more, except for this: I pray that he forgives me, for all that I have done. And may he bask forever in the glory of Elysium, a paradise that ought to be for men like him.'